Working Ranches Keep Habitat Intact for Greater Sage-Grouse

Arid prairie lands in the western United States are filled with sagebrush wildlife, but changes to this wide-open landscape have led to losses in migratory songbirds and greater sage-grouse populations. Livestock grazing is the dominant land use shaping this steppe ecosystem. The U.S. Department of Agriculture‚Äôs Natural Resource Conservation Service (NRCS) recognizes that the interaction …

Livestock Grazing and the Greater Sage-Grouse

The greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is an icon of the western United States. Its conservation status has been steeped in controversy for many years, as various groups petitioned the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) eight times since 1999 to list the sage-grouse under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). However, in September 2015 the decades …

US Fish and Wildlife Service: Greater Sage-Grouse Not Endangered

The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) has determined that the Greater Sage-Grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) is not in need of protection under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). In its September 2015 finding, FWS states that based upon the best available science, and new data showing population increases, an ESA listing is not warranted. This finding …