Weekly Update: Newfoundland Caribou Project Reveals Habitat Key to Sustainable Management

For over eight years, SCI Foundation has partnered with the Canadian Province of Newfoundland and Labrador’s Department of Environment and Conservation to support a major research program on Newfoundland Island’s woodland caribou population. The long-term scientific study has made these caribou one of the best studied wildlife populations in the world. We are pleased to …

Weekly Update: Tanzania Lion Project Launches in Serengeti

SCI Foundation, in collaboration with the Tanzania Wildlife Research Institute and the Carnivore Ecology Laboratory (CEL) at Mississippi State University, has begun what will be the most accurate population survey in the history of African lion research. Researchers have recently completed the initial stages of   field work in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. The Tanzania Lion …

Issue of the Week: African Elephant Populations Still Strong in Southern Africa

As part of an ongoing process of assessing the status of the African Elephant, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) recently released an updated species report. The IUCN Species Survival Commission’s African Elephant Specialist Group maintains a modern database that compiles the most accurate and current population survey data from the continent. The …

Issue of the Week: Successful Bear Management Leads to Opening of Hunting Season in Florida

This weekend, Florida’s first black bear hunting season in decades opens. The opening of the season is the culmination of years of bear recovery efforts. From only a few hundred individuals in the 1970s to more than 3,000 today, the Florida black bear is one of the state’s biggest conservation success stories. The opening of …

CITES Animals Committee a Success for Science-Based Conservation

The 28th Meeting of the CITES Animals Committee was held in September, attended by representatives of SCI Foundation and SCI. CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) is an agreement between governments that regulates international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants to ensure that trade does …

Positive Enhancement Finding for Argali in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Mongolia

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) recently found that the importation of argali sheep hunted in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Mongolia in 2015 would enhance the survival of the species in each country. Enhancement findings are annually required for argali before import permits are issued. A positive enhancement finding essentially means that U.S. hunters participating …

Issue of the Week: Conservation Planning Methods

To sustain wildlife populations and their habitats, biologists implement a management or conservation plan. These can be written for small areas or an entire state, but they describe a schedule for implementation of practices and activities needed to maintain habitats and species populations. Each plan normally consists of a list of conservation priorities by species …

Florida Wildlife Officials To Reopen Black Bear Hunting Season

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is in the process of updating that estimate.  In 2002, an estimated 2,500 to 3,000 bears resided in Florida. However due to a dramatic increase in reported sightings, they believe the population has grown significantly.  In response to increased human-bear conflicts and an alarming number of attacks …

SWAPS: What Are They And Why We Should Care

In 2000, Congress charged each state and U.S. territory with developing an individual State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP) to identify the species and habitats in greatest conservation need and actions required to recover species. All 50 States and five U.S. territories worked to develop a 10 year SWAP in 2005. SWAP’s outline the steps that …

Weekly Update: Ruaha African Buffalo Project Update

In August, SCI Foundation partnered with the Wildlife Health Center at the University of California, Davis (WHC) to investigate the decline of African buffalo in Ruaha National Park (RNP), Tanzania. The extent of the decline is not yet understood. Monitoring health and movement of collared buffalo throughout the year will help researchers identify areas of …